Mourning, Psychoanalysis, and the Death of Adulthood

The widely read essay by A.O. Scott, "The Death of Adulthood in American Culture" argues pretty convincingly that the changing heroes and anti-heroes of contemporary television provide a glimpse into a larger shift in contemporary life, a shift that now means adulthood as we have come to know it, is conceptually untenable. The essay received a critique for … Continue reading Mourning, Psychoanalysis, and the Death of Adulthood

All in the Family: Community, Incommensurability and Dissensus

Kennan Ferguson's All in the Family: On Community and Incommensurability puts forward a re-definition of the family as a metaphor for community. The main focus of the text is a re-interrogation of the family, away from an homogenous and normative basis for the grounding of community, but towards a definition of the family as a network of relations that … Continue reading All in the Family: Community, Incommensurability and Dissensus

Community and Subjectivity in Contemporary Theory: Dissertation Abstract

Since I have been away from writing essays and blogs for some time, it might be of interest to readers that I share the abstract of my dissertation that I have been working on, and have just finished. This is my penultimate draft and I plan to defend it this August. Overall, I feel good … Continue reading Community and Subjectivity in Contemporary Theory: Dissertation Abstract

From Shame to Love: The Politics of Hamlet. Interview with Simon Critchley

I recently interviewed the philosopher Simon Critchely on his new book, (co-written with his wife and psychoanalyst Jamieson Webster) entitled, The Hamlet Doctrine: Knowing Too Much, Doing Nothing for the online magazine Berfrois. There's a lot this book opens up not only for Shakespeare studies, but also for psychoanalysis. The idea that mosts interests me in … Continue reading From Shame to Love: The Politics of Hamlet. Interview with Simon Critchley

The Hysteric-Obsessional Dialectic in True Detective

"This world is a veil. And the face you wear is not your own." Preacher Joe TheriotIn one of the most telling lines in True Detective, Cohle says to Hart, "you're obsessed, just not with your work." Not only is this deeply funny for its brutal honesty and for the quick-witted retort of Cohle, it … Continue reading The Hysteric-Obsessional Dialectic in True Detective

Subjectivation: Aufheben or Therapy?

I've just finished After the Future by Franco "Bifo" Berardi, a text that I loved for its effortless prose and ability to convey theoretical ideas with a refreshing sense of clarity. Bifo is an expert on Guattari, and so his whole approach to the question of subjectivity is premised on a non-dialectical approach, one that … Continue reading Subjectivation: Aufheben or Therapy?

The Evolution of Lacan’s the Name-of-the-Father

The Name of the Father is an incredibly vast and important concept in Lacan's teaching. Due to the difficulty and the immensity of the concept, I have my work cut out for me, so I have decided to approach the concept from two angles: the way that the Name-of-the-Father intersects with the three-part Oedipal dialectic developed in Seminar V, and how the transition from the Name to the Names applies to clinical settings.

The Veil in Islam: A Psychoanalytic Perspective

The political philosopher Charles Taylor made an excellent observation recently when he pointed out that in those instances when multiculturalism fails to in its effort to promote a set of neutral and universal values int eh public sphere, it is often Islam that causesis often the cultural exc. The banning of the veil is an example … Continue reading The Veil in Islam: A Psychoanalytic Perspective

Some Brief Reflections on Badiou and Emancipatory Politics

I recently wrote an essay that seeks to convey some of the key ideas of Badiou as it pertains to the recent insurrections across the world. You can read the piece, "Badiou's Affirmation: Emancipatory Politics Today" which was written for the magazine Brev Spread. My focus is on how Badiou reformulates negation and its relation … Continue reading Some Brief Reflections on Badiou and Emancipatory Politics

Enjoying What We Don’t Have: Interview with Philosopher Todd McGowan

Film theorist and philosopher Todd McGowan recently spoke with me about his new book, Enjoying What We Don’t Have: The Political Project of Psychoanalysis. For however much we throw the word "accessible" around in academic discussions as the strength of a philosophy book, McGowan's accessibility really is quite stunning. In one chapter he compared the … Continue reading Enjoying What We Don’t Have: Interview with Philosopher Todd McGowan

Millennial Narcissism as a Problem of Social Recognition

The Other, for Whitman was a wholly (holy) Other to oneself. To embrace this wholly Other other was the highest ethical act of self-love. While the faint torch of Whitman's gestalt love for the All is carried forward by obscurantist New Age spiritualists, millennials are certainly faced with the challenge of narcissism - but not as a choice they take onto themselves. Rather, millennial narcissism shows signs of revolt against a mode of subjectivity that is imposed upon them.

Captured in the Image: Cynicism and Culture Jamming

We used to read the news like a Dadaist — piecing together the seemingly random series of signifiers to reveal an underlying or deeper truth. In this disarray and slanted piecing together of phrases, certain slips make themselves apparent like a series of cracks in the Real, bringing into relief the symptoms behind the news … Continue reading Captured in the Image: Cynicism and Culture Jamming

From “It” to the “Void,” Or How We Resurrected the Beat Mythology

I recently wrote an essay for a literary arts publication called Brev Spread out of the Bay Area. The editor had read a blog entry I wrote on my experiences reading the Beats and he asked me if I would be interested in expanding on it. So I decided to incorporate a philosophical account of … Continue reading From “It” to the “Void,” Or How We Resurrected the Beat Mythology

The Role of Justice and Ethics in Interfaith Dialogue (VIDEO)

I gave a talk down in Nashville recently with a group called the Family of Abraham, a multi-faith organization that formed in response to intense religious intolerance following the attempt to ban shariah law in Tennessee.  The local newspaper in Nashville, the Tennessean wrote a nice piece on the event, which you can read here, … Continue reading The Role of Justice and Ethics in Interfaith Dialogue (VIDEO)

On Shame, or the Proof of the Other’s Inexistence

In analysis, one of the most frustrating questions an analyst can ask is: "Yes, I know that's what you are saying, but is it really that way, or is what you are saying more of a wish?"  Or, I know that you think you are over this, or that you have identified the way this … Continue reading On Shame, or the Proof of the Other’s Inexistence