On Kołakowski and the Neoplatonist Pre-History of Marxism

With increasing interest in new forms of Marxism, the philosophical origins of Marx’s thought have been a topic of important debate with many studies locating Marx’s early thought in Christian theology. The early Marx often reads like a quasi-theologian when he discusses ideas of universality and the emancipation of the proletariat. But does Marx’s early … Continue reading On Kołakowski and the Neoplatonist Pre-History of Marxism

The Best Books of 2018

It's time to restore a tradition on this blog: the classic year-end best books list. 2018 has been a fairly significant year for my research and reading. As you will see below, my primary concerns orbit around political economy, psychoanalysis, the history of Marxist thought, the Black Radical Tradition, the theological genealogy of socialist thought, … Continue reading The Best Books of 2018

The Death of Storytelling and the Rise of Myth

In the 1960’s, capital valuation cycles occurred in an average of three-year cycles. Capital would hang around in one place for an average of three years. But by the 1990’s, capital valuation cycles were reduced to just three months. This hyper financialization of capital produced a highly unstable worker, and with it the rise of … Continue reading The Death of Storytelling and the Rise of Myth

Is the Stock Market a “Camp”? Towards a Cosmic Politics 

Arne De Boever's book Finance Fictions: Realism and Psychosis in a Time of Economic Crisis is not providing a new psychoanalytic analysis of psychosis, which I immediately thought it might offer. But it is an important contribution to what is now a steadily growing sub-literature within contemporary philosophy and theory on the topic of the market and finance. … Continue reading Is the Stock Market a “Camp”? Towards a Cosmic Politics 

Teaching Philosophy in Prison

Next month, I will teach a class for inmates in the DC jail as part of the JCI Prison Scholars Program. I'll most definitely plan to write about the class. Here is the syllabus for the course. Key Themes in Social and Political Thought JCI Prison Scholars Program, May – July 2018 In this course, … Continue reading Teaching Philosophy in Prison

Dissolving the I in the We: Love and the Problem of Community

I'm giving a lecture at St. John Fisher University in Rochester, NY called “Dissolving the I in the We: Love and the Problem of Community.” This lecture is a part of the annual St. Thomas More lecture series in ethics. I plan to address the theme of community and look more specifically at the function and … Continue reading Dissolving the I in the We: Love and the Problem of Community

Colloquium Workshop: “Islam and Psychoanalysis”

You can attend a workshop I'm pleased to offer on the topic of "Islam and Psychoanalysis" at Georgetown University. Here are the details and a link to the suggested reading: Daniel Tutt: “Islam and Psychoanalysis” Time:Wednesday, February 28th, 12:30pm Location: Georgetown University, ICC 450 **Open to the public. Food provided The Department of Arabic and Islamic … Continue reading Colloquium Workshop: “Islam and Psychoanalysis”

Whither the critique of political economy in post-Marxism?

In my dissertation, I made an argument that the decisionism of Badiou, Zizek, Laclau and other so-called 'post-Marxist' theorists is derived from an intra-theoretical debate amongst left-Heideggerians, specifically against the pervasive authenticity politics and existentialist politics of the time. I argue that Lacan's 'ontology of lack' was the alternative formula that enabled these thinkers to … Continue reading Whither the critique of political economy in post-Marxism?

Something Bigger: Lady Bird and the Divinity of the Name

“a something, a greater than which cannot be conceived.” St. Anselm Amidst the fanfare and excitement over Lady Bird, a lingering debate about the film is whether the family of Lady Bird really "lived in poverty." Some people want to suggest that her position was really just lower middle class striving, a more ordinary American family struggling … Continue reading Something Bigger: Lady Bird and the Divinity of the Name

Vultures and Starlings: Class and Debt Feudalism in Ozark

The European Starling was first introduced to America by a Shakespeare enthusiast who felt that New York city, already a booming theater-going town in the early 1800's, must have every species of bird Shakespeare ever wrote about. Just last year, 1.7 million of these foreign Starlings were poisoned and put to death. It's now legal … Continue reading Vultures and Starlings: Class and Debt Feudalism in Ozark

Obscure Subjects: Myth and Metapolitics on the alt-Right

I have a new blog/essay up at the Critical Theory Research Network called "Obscure Subjects: Myth and Metapolitics on the alt-Right." Here is an overview: In this piece, I consider the syndicalist intellectual Georges Sorel and his influence on early 20th century fascism in France and Italy prior to the rise of the Nazis in … Continue reading Obscure Subjects: Myth and Metapolitics on the alt-Right

Lukács, labor and the humanization of man

The premise that the economic sphere impacts the moral sphere of society is well accepted. Marxists claim such a separation of these spheres, whether in functional or analytic analysis results in idealism. Thus, the wager that the task of critique is to isolate or show how an autonomy of these spheres is possible is deeply … Continue reading Lukács, labor and the humanization of man

A post clash of civilizations framework?

What if Trump's upcoming speech in Saudi Arabia signifies a shift at the level of discourse -- one that effectively propels international relations into a new, post clash of civilizations framework? A post clash framework no longer requires any allusion to the idea that the west has a moral duty to help Islam revive its lost greatness, … Continue reading A post clash of civilizations framework?

Jameson on Badiou: Ships Passing in the Night

The American Marxist literary theorist Fredric Jameson's latest article in the New Left Review, "Badiou and the French Tradition" (full PDF here) ends by noting the most important omissions Badiou makes throughout his oeuvre. I find Jameson's reading of Badiou highly contradictory and sloppy at times. Jameson gives us a reading of Badiou that takes … Continue reading Jameson on Badiou: Ships Passing in the Night