Elements of Islamophobia: The State, Class and Capital

I have a new essay up at Heathwood Press as part of their special series on Crisis Capitalism and Creeping Fascism – Bigotry, Racism, and the Rise of the Right in the Age of Neoliberal Barbarism. Please support Heathwood Press, an important new publisher working to revive the project of critical theory for today. Here … Continue reading Elements of Islamophobia: The State, Class and Capital

Identification in Lacanian Psychoanalysis – Audio Lecture

As part of the clinical Wednesday series with the DC Lacanian Forum, I gave my third presentation to the group, this time on the theme of identification. I begin with an analysis of identification in Freud's Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego and look at Borch-Jacobsen's critique of Freud in his controversial The … Continue reading Identification in Lacanian Psychoanalysis – Audio Lecture

New essay on Deleuze and Islamic Philosophy

I have a review essay that explores Deleuze and Islamic philosophy. It focuses on the thought of Mulla Sadrā and his theory of the act of being in relation to Deleuze's theory of immanence. The essay is based on a reading of two new books on Deleuze and theology: Daniel Colucciello Barber's, Deleuze and the Naming … Continue reading New essay on Deleuze and Islamic Philosophy

Identification and emancipation: unary trait or unary trace?

Political philosophy has considered its project of thinking to be ‘emancipatory’ since the enlightenment. Emancipation is a term that refers to the idea of a total freedom from ignorance, from animality, or from a state of ‘self-imposed tutelage’ – as Kant would say in What is Enlightenment. Today, the question of emancipation has taken new … Continue reading Identification and emancipation: unary trait or unary trace?

David Foster Wallace and the Politics of Existential Loneliness

The David Foster Wallace movie "The End of the Tour" is generally pretty good. The acting was superb and I like the way the dialogue and the relationship between DFW and the Rolling Stone magazine journalist played out. I read Infinite Jest in my early 20's and funny enough the film noted several times that the prime … Continue reading David Foster Wallace and the Politics of Existential Loneliness

Should Critical Theory Be Accessible?

It's widely held that critical theory and left theory more generally is too opaque for a wide audience and that's a bad thing. It's bad for a number of reasons. The more accessible one's writing, the wider your audience will be. The wider your audience, the more potential your thought has to enact change. The premise behind … Continue reading Should Critical Theory Be Accessible?

Islam as Empty Signifier and the Caliphate as Zero Institution: On Sayyid’s Recalling the Caliphate

Sayyid Qutb famously argued that Islam is in a state of jahaliya, or pre-Islamic ignorance in the modern world. This condition was total, extending both within and outside of Islamic majority societies. Qutb is considered a godfather of Islamist intellectuals because his position opened Islam to the political, and the consequence of Qutub’s idea calls … Continue reading Islam as Empty Signifier and the Caliphate as Zero Institution: On Sayyid’s Recalling the Caliphate

Philosophy as Confession

My philosophical writing goes through cycles. I experience low points where my exhaustion with philosophy and the project of mastering logos and the Real is made so acute that I fall-back on writing narrative, poetry, or fiction. This fall-back is always confessional in nature. It feels as if I am confessing to the master who has turned away … Continue reading Philosophy as Confession

Is All Identity a Social Construct? Towards a Political Taxonomy of Rachel Dolezal

The #RachelDolezal story has sent social media into a tailspin. The details of the story are covered well in this original article from the local Spokane, WA newspaper where Rachel is based. We learn that Rachel Dolezal, a black woman artist and activist, married to a black man with adopted black babies and leader of an NAACP chapter … Continue reading Is All Identity a Social Construct? Towards a Political Taxonomy of Rachel Dolezal

Religion and Communitas: Structure and Anti-Structure

One of the reasons that religion persists in human civilization is because it is able to incorporate what the anthropologist Victor Turner calls communitas into structure, or normal society. Turner is a philosophical anthropologist, and in his classic study The Ritual Process: Structure and Anti-Structure, he points out how the liminal or transitional experiences of rituals … Continue reading Religion and Communitas: Structure and Anti-Structure

The Infantilization of Evangelicals in American Politics

When Karl Rove mobilized the Evangelical vote in the 2000 election, he opened a Pandora's Box that everyone would subsequently try to close -- or master. Evangelicals didn't know they had such power politically, and it scared them. This fear has led them to retreat from politics -- on a large scale -- over the last eight years. … Continue reading The Infantilization of Evangelicals in American Politics

The Crowd and the Collective: Some Speculative Points

In Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego, Freud says that “each individual taken independently is a constitutive part of different crowds." I understand this in two ways: the individual is a part of different crowds in the abstract sense that the crowd is a part of the subjective process in some way. The … Continue reading The Crowd and the Collective: Some Speculative Points

Becoming Your Own Boss. On Nightcrawler

How do we situate the film Nightcrawler by Dan Gilroy both in terms of its social commentary and genre? At a certain level, it's like American Psycho for the post 2008 economic downturn and late finance capitalism period. Both films are ostensibly about how capitalist competition creates an intense sociopathy when subjects identify with the explicit demands … Continue reading Becoming Your Own Boss. On Nightcrawler

Excerpt: Thinking Islamic Governance with Continental Philosophy

I have a new essay on Wael Hallaq's book, The Impossible State: Islam, Politics, and Modernity’s Moral Predicament at the very excellent publication Society for Contemporary Thought and the Islamicate World (http://sctiw.org/sctiw_review) coming out on February 10th. My main interest in this essay, in addition to reviewing the book, is to start a dialogue with Islam and continental philosophy … Continue reading Excerpt: Thinking Islamic Governance with Continental Philosophy

The Amputated Father: Kojève’s Theory of Revolution and Authority

With Agamben's recent invoking of Kojève's idea of the Latin empire against the German dominance in Europe, and with the recent translation of the short manifesto on authority Kojève wrote amidst the Second World War, it is worth revisiting exactly what sort of theory of revolution Kojève was concerned with. My review of The Notion of Authority: … Continue reading The Amputated Father: Kojève’s Theory of Revolution and Authority

My Book Review of The Left Hemisphere: Mapping Critical Theory Today

My review of Remzig Keucheyan's, The Left Hemisphere: Mapping Critical Theory Today is up at the Huffington Post. As you can see from my review, I found the book to be a tremendous contribution to the field of left politics and organization and to the academic field of critical theory. Has critical theory begun to shrug off the … Continue reading My Book Review of The Left Hemisphere: Mapping Critical Theory Today

Public Series of Lectures on Resistance, Protest and Social Struggles

I'm hosting a public series for GCAS on the topic of Resistance, Protest and Social Struggles. This free and open to the public series will feature weekly lectures from philosophers, theorists and activists. We will meet weekly on Saturday’s starting February 7th to May 2nd. To register for this free series go here. The series is free and … Continue reading Public Series of Lectures on Resistance, Protest and Social Struggles

An Interview with Dr. Daniel Tutt about his GCAS Series, “Badiou & Philosophy”

Here is an interview with the Global Center for Advanced Studies.

GCAS--The BLOG

GCAS Interview with Daniel Tutt on Badiou and Philosophy–To register and study with Alain Badiou & Daniel Tutt please follow this link:  https://globalcenterforadvancedstudies.org/gcas-badiou-and-philosophy-series/

Daniel Tutt, PhD Daniel Tutt, PhD

January 11, 2015

Q:  What is your relationship with Alain Badiou?

Daniel Tutt:  I am a student of Alain Badiou. After attending a couple of his seminars at the European Graduate School, I asked if he would advise my dissertation and he agreed. During the process of working on my dissertation, which looked at the question of community and subjectivity in contemporary thought, I put together the idea of making a film about philosophy, inspired largely by Badiou’s thought. Film is a really long and often-brutal process of discovery, and this film is still ongoing, but Badiou agreed early on to be interviewed for the film. This film is looking at what philosophers have to say about the return of massive social struggles…

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Why Do the Masses Posses Reason?

The figure of the masses in protest takes on a near mystical and highly rational logic in post-Leninist thought during the twentieth century. For example, one of the things that Althusser abandoned in his theory of overdetermination was that the general contradiction between forces of production and relations of production--embodied in the antagonistic relation between the two … Continue reading Why Do the Masses Posses Reason?